Gunners Garage

AMC cars are catching on with collectors

This all-original 1964 Rambler was seen at a local car show last spring.

This all-original 1964 Rambler was seen at a local car show last spring.

 

Anyone who has visited Gunner’s Great Garage and met my son Jesse knows that he is a quiet young man. He is also my secret weapon for keeping abreast of changes in the old-car marketplace. You see, Jesse spends a lot of time reading old car magazines and checking out cars for sale on Craigslist, eBay and other Website. When a certain brand of car is hot, he knows it.

According to Jesse, American Motors Corp. (AMC) cars are growing in popularity and value lately. Whether it’s a Nash from the 1930s, a late-‘40s Step-Down Hudson, an early 1950s “Lois Lane” Rambler ragtop, a mid-‘60s Ambassador luxomobile or a ‘70s AMX muscle machine, cars with AMC nameplates seem to be catching on more and more with car collectors.

AMC was formed in 1954 when Nash and Hudson merged together, but the use of an AMC nameplate on the cars themselves didn’t happen until the early-1960s. AMC “Family” cars are known for innovation and uniqueness. Family members range from NASCAR winning Hudson Hornets, to cute little Metropolitans (with both Hudson and Nash badges) to Jeeps of certain years.

AMC made collectible convertibles, station wagons, roadsters (such as the Nash-Healey) and even muscular two-passenger coupes. Family members turned out many distinctive models that resembled nothing else in the marketplace. AMC brands have always had a more youthful following than other brands of cars and this may well be the reason for increasing interest in them.

With the trend-revealing Arizona auctions coming up in January, it might be a good idea to keep your eyes peeled on the prices that AMC cars bring in Scottsdale and Phoenix. Picking up on a trend before it explodes can lead to picking up bargains in the local markets before the word on AMC gets around.

 

 

 

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