Rare Ranchero

Ron Kowalke Old Cars Weekly |

Crazy ’bout a Mercury, as the song lyric implies, is a natural reaction
to this Ford of Canada 1957 Meteor Custom 300 Ranchero pickup.
It is formerly part of the Jess Ruffalo Collection of Plainfield, Wis.

“The 1957 Fleet of Mighty Mercury Trucks” is the title of Ford of Canada’s brochure that promoted its line of light-duty Mercury models for that year. The brochure’s tagline reads: “With Exclusive Payoff Design.”

Using words such as “mighty” and “payoff” seem appropriate when describing the utilitarian reputation common to trucks. But these work-like terms seem out of place when applied to the ornate, chrome-laden appearance of Mercury’s ’57 Meteor Ranchero pickup. And, yes, you read that correctly.

Mercury — not Ford — Ranchero.
A product of Ford Motor Co. of Canada Ltd., based in Oakville, Ontario, its Mercury division produced both Ranchero Custom and Ranchero Custom 300 trim level pickups in both 1957 and ’58. Production was miniscule in each model year, with 312 of both Custom and Custom 300 pickups built in 1957 and only 90 in ’58. There is no breakout available by trim level.

The text within the 1957 Mercury truck brochure even downplays the utilitarian aspects of the Meteor Ranchero. It’s promoted as being “smartly styled with fine car comfort.” Somewhat more in tune to the fact the vehicle is a truck, the brochure description continues calling the Meteor Ranchero the “perfect companion for work or play.”

Mystery history
This particular Meteor Ranchero was formerly part of the late Jess Ruffalo Collection of Plainfield, Wis. It was recently offered for sale at Matthews Auctions’ May 1 sale in Wisconsin Rapids, Wis., by Ruffalo’s son, Brian, who is now the pickup’s caretaker. Ruffalo readily admits that his knowledge of the pickup’s history and aspects of its restoration are limited. The high bid at auction of $37,500 failed to meet the Ranchero’s reserve, and Brian Ruffalo returned with it to his Hancock, Wis., home.

Ruffalo told Old Cars Weekly that he will entertain all serious offers to buy the rare pickup. Failing to find success going that route will most likely find the Ranchero crossing the auction block at one of the more high-profile upcoming auctions that allow consignors to place reserves on vehicles.

What is known about this Ranchero is sketchy. Ruffalo said his father acquired the pickup in Arizona in 2002 from Bob Schmidt, who, at that time, was in the restoration business in Phoenix. He later moved to Branson, Mo., and was curator of the 57 Heaven Museum in that city until its recent closing.

Schmidt told Old Cars Weekly he purchased the Ranchero for $3,500 at the Pomona (California) Swap Meet. His original intention was to restore it and eventually display it at the 57 Heaven Museum. He added that when he mentioned to friend Jess Ruffalo that he bought the pickup, Ruffalo asked to buy the Ranchero for his own collection, and a deal was struck.

“It was in rough shape when I bought it,” Schmidt recalled. When it was offered for sale in Pomona, Schmidt said the only item missing were the “Meteor” embossed hubcaps. “Those were extremely hard to find.”

In its current configuration, the Meteor Ranchero has a 30-cubic-foot bed and 1,000-lb. pay load. It rides on a 118-inch wheelbase, and is powered by what Ruffalo said is a 292-cid/212-hp V-8 and Merc-O-Matic automatic transmission. The 292 was not offered in Meteor Rancheros in ’57, but was available in other Ford of Canada models that year. Its smaller Y-block counterpart, the 272-cid/190-hp version, was the only V-8 offered in Meteor Rancheros, and as an option.

But, according to the Ranchero’s data plate, the initial number (“5”) in the pickup’s serial number designates that it came from the factory as a Meteor six-cylinder model. This would have been the inline, 223-cid/144-hp powerplant.

Schmidt verified that the 292 was in the Ranchero when he bought it.

Another mystery, depending on what source is used to define Meteor body codes, questions the trim level of this Ranchero, based on the “66B” in its data plate’s serial number. One source lists 66A as the base Ranchero Custom and 66B as the upper Custom 300 trim level. Another source defines 66A as being a Niagara (one of five series within the Meteor line) Ranchero, with “66B” and “66C” reserved for Custom and Custom 300, respectively. In no other Ford of Canada model menu does the Niagara offer a Ranchero pickup. Based both on that latter scenario and the amount of chrome and interior appointments on this Ranchero, it most likely is the more upscale Custom 300 model.

Cover up
Another changed aspect of this Ranchero stems from its finish. None of the colors that are listed as being available for 1957 Meteors in Ford of Canada sources match its current two-tone paint scheme. The pickup’s data plate lists its exterior paint code as “5A.” Schmidt said that when he found the Ranchero in California, “it was the ugliest combination of tan and brown you could imagine.” It turns out that Schmidt selected the current persimmon and black scheme to dress up the Ranchero. It’s a combination that was offered on domestic ’56 Mercury cars, but not ’57 Meteors.

In keeping with the Ford Motor Co. family of replacement items, Schmidt told Old Cars Weekly that he also replaced the Ranchero’s worn original interior fabric with that from a ’58 Edsel. “It looks period and complements the exterior paint,” Schmidt explained. “Ninety-nine percent of the people who look at it don’t realize it’s not the original [Meteor] fabric.” 

Moving on
The Meteor Ranchero has logged approximately 90,000 miles, but has the appearance of a new vehicle. “It’s in nice shape,” Ruffalo stressed. “It’s as clean on the bottom as it is on top.”



The 1957 Mercury Meteor Ranchero pickup has several unique treatments that distinguish it from its domestic Ford counterpart. “Meteor” script is found on the leading edge of the hood (top), on hubcap centers (center) and centered on the rear bumper (bottom). The Meteor’s ornate V’ed grille is also unique to this Ford of Canada product.  

More about Mercuries:

 

More Resources For Car Collectors:

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While its dataplate defines the Meteor Ranchero as originally being equipped with a six-cylinder engine, the pickup is currently powered by what is believed to be a 292-cid V-8, which was not offered in Meteor Rancheros in 1957.
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The Meteor Ranchero’s data plate reveals inconsistencies in how the pickup is currently equipped. The initial “5” in the serial number was assigned to a Meteor six-cylinder whereas the Ranchero is currently equipped with what is believed to be the 292-cid V-8, which was not offered in Meteors in ’57. The following “66B” denotes the top-level Custom 300 trim level (while the base Custom is labeled “66A”). “K” identifies the Oakville, Ontario, assembly plant. “57” is the vehicle’s model year and “7258” defines the vehicle’s build sequence number. The “5A” paint code is an undefined combination of tan and brown. The car’s current finish is persimmon and black, which was not offered on Ford of Canada’s ’57 Meteor line.

2 Responses to Rare Ranchero

  1. Nick Grabas says:

    Hi, I have just purchased a 57 Ranchero (Ford) and am trying to decode the vin and paint codes. Wondered if you would be able to help?
    VIN is 466BK57561935 and paint code is 9A.
    The car has only 33,000 miles and there is some history from the original owner, however it has been re-painted and is currently white over red. The engine is a V8 but have not yet determined the ci.
    Any assistance would be greatfully appreciated.
    * I also have a 57 Meteor Ranchero that is in need of TOTAL RESTORATION that I plan to start working on in the next 6-12 months.
    I thank you in advance for your help.
    Respectfully,
    Nick Grabas
    Anything Paint & Auto Body Ltd.
    Kamloops, B.C.

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