Prewar Cars a Part of Silver Auctions

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While the majority of auction vehicles that will invade the Scottsdale/Phoenix area over the mid-portion of January represent the more modern categories of muscle cars, exotic sports cars, hot rods, and customs, there is still room (and buyers looking) for automobiles from the early years.

Silver Auctions fills this void with several cars that are examples of the range of cars available in those pioneering days of motoring, from grand touring cars assembled for the wealthy to inexpensive cars built for the masses.
The brass-era beauty is reflected in what could easily be the tallest automobile offered for sale at Silver Auctions in the form of a 1906 Pierce-Racine touring, one of only 150 P-R models built that year. Built in Racine, Wisconsin (and not affiliated with Pierce-Arrow), the Pierce-Racine is the precursor to the Case automobile after 1911.

While companies such as Pierce-Racine built cars one at a time, mass-production was the routine at Ford and General Motors in their formative years. These two marques will have prewar representation at Silver Auctions via a 1931 Model A Ford two-door sedan and a 1940 Chevrolet Special Deluxe five-window coupe. The affordable Depression-era Model A kept Ford Motor Co. in business during lean times, while the Chevy is an example of a car that would have to be kept running at all costs for years to come, while American automobile production was halted during World War II.
And while not a prewar car, or even of American manufacture, those buyers seeking a truly unique driving experience can bid on a 1957 Messerschmitt KB-200 “Kabinenroller” (cabin scooter). This German “coupe” was produced from 1955-’64 by the same manufacturer that created Germany’s most respected World War II fighter plane, the ME109. Topped by a Plexiglas canopy top, the three-wheeled wonder has a top speed of 62 mph.

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