Patch panels made easy: Rust busting on a ’37 Chevy school bus

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In these 4 photos you can see magnets are used to hold the patch panel in place while it is tack welded. The initial welds are made several inches apart by Fast Freddie’s bodyman Peter Schnoor. He then welds all the way around the panel, alternating locations so the metal doesn’t become overheated. Compressed air is used immediately after each weld to “purge” the weld and keep warping to a minimum. “You can tell when it gets just a little too hot, and when you hit it with cold air, you can actually watch it pull back out,” Schnoor noted. “On an open panel like this, you’re always going to have a little bit of warping or shrinkage, but it’s nice to try to control it as much as possible.”

In these 4 photos you can see magnets are used to hold the patch panel in place while it is tack welded. The initial welds are made several inches apart by Fast Freddie’s bodyman Peter Schnoor. He then welds all the way around the panel, alternating locations so the metal doesn’t become overheated. Compressed air is used immediately after each weld to “purge” the weld and keep warping to a minimum. “You can tell when it gets just a little too hot, and when you hit it with cold air, you can actually watch it pull back out,” Schnoor noted. “On an open panel like this, you’re always going to have a little bit of warping or shrinkage, but it’s nice to try to control it as much as possible.”

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