Tag Archives: installation

Make vacuum leaks hiss-tory

Vacuum leaks can be located with spray carburetor cleaner or a can of WD-40. If the area is obstructed by linkage or hoses, use an extension nozzle to pinpoint the area of the vacuum leak. If the engine speeds up when an area is sprayed, you are close to finding the leak.

Insufficient intake manifold vacuum can be deadly to an internal-combustion engine. It will reduce engine efficiency, causing a loss of power and fuel economy and rough operation, especially at idle. Prolonged vacuum leaks can eventually cause serious engine damage. Here’s how to fix it. More »

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Hub of Motion: Replacing bearings on a full-floating hub system

The inner end of the hub passes through the new brake rotor and bolts in place. Grease is added to fill the void between inner and outer bearings. Then, the felt seal is placed in the dust cover, which is tapped into the outer end of the hub.

Some of the following information and parts sources will be helpful whether you’re working on a British sports car or a Model A Ford. Removing and installing bearings, greasing hubs, brake repairs and tips on tools are pretty much universal, no matter what vehicle you’re restoring. More »

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Upholstery 101: An armrest project without too much elbow grease

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Fabricating new armrest covers is a fairly straightforward proposition that uses some basic techniques and the existing material as a pattern. We’ll show you how. More »

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Bumper Bolt-Up: Challenger gets repro bumper

Sean Branson eyeballs the new mounting brackets to determine if the existing holes will work. “A lot of times you’ll have to hog out some holes and maybe do a little welding on the brackets,” he said. “We have an aftermarket bumper and aftermarket bracket, and a lot of times you’ll be just an 1/8 inch off and you’ll have to adjust the holes. This gives you a lot of adjustment left to right, but not as much up and down."

The rear bumper on this Dodge Challenger couldn’t be saved. But Fast Freddie’s Rod Shop in Eau Claire, Wis., had a solution. See step-by-step installation. More »

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