Tag Archives: mechanical

Make vacuum leaks hiss-tory

Vacuum leaks can be located with spray carburetor cleaner or a can of WD-40. If the area is obstructed by linkage or hoses, use an extension nozzle to pinpoint the area of the vacuum leak. If the engine speeds up when an area is sprayed, you are close to finding the leak.

Insufficient intake manifold vacuum can be deadly to an internal-combustion engine. It will reduce engine efficiency, causing a loss of power and fuel economy and rough operation, especially at idle. Prolonged vacuum leaks can eventually cause serious engine damage. Here’s how to fix it. More »

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Hub of Motion: Replacing bearings on a full-floating hub system

The inner end of the hub passes through the new brake rotor and bolts in place. Grease is added to fill the void between inner and outer bearings. Then, the felt seal is placed in the dust cover, which is tapped into the outer end of the hub.

Some of the following information and parts sources will be helpful whether you’re working on a British sports car or a Model A Ford. Removing and installing bearings, greasing hubs, brake repairs and tips on tools are pretty much universal, no matter what vehicle you’re restoring. More »

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New brake booster has Saratoga ready to roll again

The original brake booster unit in this 1957 Chrysler Saratoga needed to be replaced. Inevitably, rubber pieces wear out through time, and a Mopar unit is basically a rubber accordion that moves back and forth as the brake pedal is used.

The original brake booster unit in this 1957 Chrysler Saratoga needed to be replaced. Follow these steps to give your car a boost. More »

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